The Deadly Sins of Employee Engagement Surveys (30-Day Recording)

Leadership IQ

$199.00 USD 

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This is a recorded webinar. As soon as you purchase, you will receive an email that gives you access to watch the program for as many times as you want for 30 days. You will also get access to download the slides.

Most companies are making huge mistakes on their employee engagement surveys. If you’ve ever wondered why your scores aren’t increasing very much (or at all), this program will reveal exactly what you’re doing wrong and how to fix it.

Do you know why you can’t ask employees if they’re satisfied with their job? Or why you can’t use a 5-point scale (and what to use instead)? Or why managers continually struggle to take action on your survey results?

Presented by one of the country’s leading employee survey experts, you’ll learn the Deadly Sins of Employee Engagement Surveys (and how to fix them).

Warning: Due to the huge amount of trade secrets and insider information about the survey industry provided in this program, we cannot permit anyone who works for a survey company to attend.

This 1 hour webinar called “Deadly Sins of Employee Engagement Surveys” will show you:

  • Why you should never ask employees if they’re satisfied (and the one question you should ALWAYS ask instead)
  • Why 5 point scales don’t work (and what scale you should use instead)
  • The 4 worst survey questions that you should delete before your next survey
  • The 6 words that you should always say when you feed back your survey results to employees
  • One simple test that you can use on every survey question to assess whether it’s a good or bad question
  • 5 questions that you can use to link your employee surveys with other surveys (like customer, patient, safety, physician, etc.)
  • The secret of getting tremendously high response rates
  • 3 analytical reports that make your survey results leap off the page
  • How 1 mistake on your survey scales and survey questions could actually be reducing your scores
  • 3 questions that should always appear in your employee engagement surveys
  • Why you should never use correlations on your survey data (and the statistical technique you need to use instead)
  • The 1 issue that every CEO wants to see in their employee survey
  • The 2-step process that holds managers accountable for implementing their survey results

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