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When people follow me, it’s because…

Last week, more than 7,000 people took our quiz called “What Type of Power Do You Use?” And while we’re still analyzing all the data, something interesting has already emerged.

One of the questions on the quiz asked:
When people follow me it’s because…
A. They like me as a person
B. I’m seen as powerful or influential

Overall, when we look at all 7,000+ responses, there’s a pretty even split between A and B. But, that split is not so even when you dissect the responses by how high-up the person is in the organizational hierarchy. See the chart below (and click on the different job levels to see how the responses change)…

WHAT DOES THIS MEAN? Well, this is not unexpected. As people gain more formal authority, they’re going to be seen as more influential. Makes sense, right? But there are two things to watch out for as you think about how this applies to you personally…

FIRST, I’m a bit worried that Middle Managers are not taking advantage of all their available influence and power. There are a lot of Middle Managers who rely solely on being liked as a means of getting their employees to do things. And while that’s okay much of the time, there are instances where you really do need to use sources of power beyond being liked (because not every action you’re going to request is going to make you ‘likeable’.)

SECOND, Senior Executives do need to ensure that they don’t lose all of their likeability. Being powerful is totally fine, but I do see occasions where executives rely solely on ‘do it because I’m the boss’ as a means of getting things done. And that act can get old pretty quickly.

So, while these results are not unexpected, do be mindful of how you use various sources of power, and try not to fall into stereotypical patterns.

To explore these topics even further, join us Friday for our webinar called THE SCIENCE OF GETTING POWER AND INFLUENCE.

Quiz: What Type of POWER Do You Use?

Are You Spending Enough Time with Your Boss…Or Too Much?

Washington, DC (June 18, 2014) – According to a new study by Leadership IQ, most people spend only half the time they should be spending with their boss. People who do spend an optimal number of hours interacting with their direct leader (six hours per week) are 29% more inspired, 30% more engaged, 16% more innovative and 15% more intrinsically motivated than those who spend only one hour per week.

However, it turns out that there can be too much of a good thing. When people spend more than six hours per week interacting with their leader, diminishing returns are shown in terms of building inspiration, engagement and motivation. While there may be other benefits to interacting with one’s leader more than 6 hours per week, this study shows levels of inspiration or engagement remain the same or declined beyond 6 hours of interaction. The only exception to this is seen in innovation, which shows spikes at 11-15 hours, and again at 20+ hours spent with their leader.

How Should Time Be Spent with Your Leader? Of the many ways people communicate with their leaders (face-to-face, email, phone, video conferencing, texting, social media, etc.), face-to-face and email are by far the most common. These modes shifted as respondents spent more time interacting in person with their leader. Most notably, among people who only spend 1 hour per week interacting with their leader, 33% of that time is spent in face-to-face interaction and 42% is spent via email. By contrast, those who spend 6 hours per week interacting with their leader spend much more of their time (48%) in face-to-face interactions, and much less of their time (27%) interacting via email. So the findings indicate that not only is the amount of time spent interacting with one’s leader important, but increasing the percentage of face-to-face interaction matters as well.

DOWNLOAD THE FULL REPORT HERE

 

 

Are we hiring for attitude?

I’m sure you’ve all seen our landmark research about Hiring for Attitude (i.e. that when new hires fail, 89% of the time it’s for attitude, not for lack of technical skills).

Well, it seems that organizations of all sizes are still struggling to hire for attitude. Looking at the responses of 20,216 people from our public employee engagement survey, it’s clear that most employees feel their companies are NOT doing a great job of hiring people that have the right attitude to fit their cultures. Check out this chart…

 
Because of the acute need to improve this, on Friday we’re hosting our famous webinar Hiring for Attitude. I invite you to check it out. And by the way, if you register this week, we will automatically include a recording for the program (so you can watch it again and again over the following 30 days).

The 20,216 responses were collected from our Self-Engagement Assessment during the first quarter of 2014. This assessment asks 100+ questions about various aspects of leadership and organizational life. And then, after you take the assessment, you get your own personal Self-Engagement Report delivered via email. If you have a few minutes and feel like participating, click here.

UPCOMING WEBINAR: Hiring for Attitude.
 

Do remote employees differ from the people in the office?

We’ve been studying The Science of Managing Remote Employees for a while now, and we’re seeing some interesting trends. First, I should note that there’s more subtle gradations than just remote vs. non-remote.

  • First, there’s all the people in traditional (non-remote) workplaces.
  • Second, there’s the telework crowd (people who work from home).
  • Third, there’s the mobile folks (think of consultants and salespeople who travel all over and are rarely in the office, but are not working from their house).
  •  
    Now, there’s actually some pretty big differences between the telework and mobile folks. For example, if you look at the chart below (based on responses from 20,216 employees), you’ll see that the mobile employees are quite a bit more engaged than teleworking employees. In fact, there’s a greater percentage of mobile employees who Always recommend their company than there are in traditional worksites. That finding alone is quite shocking.

    Now, one thing we wondered was whether there’s just something inherently different about the people who are in those mobile jobs compared to traditional or teleworking arrangements. And while it’s possible, we’ve also discovered that there are some clear behavioral differences.

    If you look at the chart below, you’ll see when employees are asked if they keep generating great ideas every week to help their organizations improve, the mobile employees do it much more than the telework or traditional worksite folks. And if we broaden our analysis a bit and add together the people who say Always and Frequently, 46% of mobile workers answer that way, while the scores are only 39% for telework and 41% for traditional worksites.

    NOTE: I’ll be covering a number of these behavioral differences on this Friday’s webinar called The Science of Managing Remote Employees.

    The 20,216 responses were collected from our Self-Engagement Assessment during the first quarter of 2014. This assessment asks 100+ questions about various aspects of leadership and organizational life. And then, after you take the assessment, you get your own personal Self-Engagement Report delivered via email. If you have a few minutes and feel like participating, click here.

    UPCOMING WEBINAR: The Science of Managing Remote Employees.

    A new video about Employee Engagement Surveys

     

    How can you learn more about our revolutionary engagement survey?

    Just send an email to Meaghan Joynt (one of our survey salespeople) at  meaghan@leadershipiq.com and tell us the size of your company, if you’ve done engagement surveys before, and when you’re looking to do your next survey. Or, you can call Meaghan at 800-814-7859.

    Test Your Leadership: Are You a 100% Leader?


    Leadership IQ uses puppets to teach you how NOT to give constructive feedback

    To announce our upcoming webinar called Giving Constructive Feedback Without Making People Angry, we created a video with puppets!

    These puppets will show you why you should NOT use the Compliment Sandwich (it’s a terrible way to give constructive feedback).

    So, enjoy the puppets (and be sure to reserve your seat on this amazing webinar).

     

    Did you enjoy the puppets? Be sure to reserve your seat for Giving Constructive Feedback Without Making People Angry.

    Learn more here:
    http://www.leadershipiq.com/webinar/giving-constructive-feedback-without-making-people-angry/

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