The Blog by Mark Murphy and Leadership IQ

Posts in the Telecommuting category

You're 87% More Likely To Love Your Job If You Work From Home

TelecommuteWe discovered that people who work from home (i.e., telecommuting) are almost twice as likely to love their jobs than employees who work in traditional co-located work-sites (like office buildings). And mobile workers (i.e., using multiple workspaces, in and out of the office) were about 58% more likely to love their job than their office-based peers.
First we asked people where they usually work (in an office, mobile or telecommute). And then we asked people to rate how they felt about their job (love, like, tolerate, dislike or hate). Here’s what we found.

Posted by Mark Murphy on 13 April, 2017 Forbes, Research, Telecommuting | 0 comments | Read more →

Quiz: Is Your Personality More Suited To The Corporate World Or The Gig Economy?

Posted by Mark Murphy on 11 April, 2017 Interpersonal Skills, Quizzes, Telecommuting | 0 comments | Read more →

Here's The Phatic Expression You Should Never Say To Remote Employees


Deep and meaningful conversations are a hallmark of
 successful managers of remote employees. But while a lot of managers are talking to their remote employees, they’re not learning anything important during those conversations. A good litmus test of how productive your conversations with remote employees are is to ask yourself if your remote people are sharing with you their problems, bad news, struggles, challenges and all the other things you need to know to keep your people accountable and aligned.
Posted by Mark Murphy on 10 April, 2017 Forbes, Telecommuting | 0 comments | Read more →

Quiz: Is Your Personality Suited To Working Remotely Or In The Office?

Posted by Mark Murphy on 02 January, 2017 Interpersonal Skills, Quizzes, Telecommuting | 7 comments | Read more →

Video: Biggest Fear for Employees That Telecommute

Remote employees, those that telecommute, often have a fear that doesn't afflict their co-located compatriots and that is, am I going to be forgotten about? Am I out of sight, out of mind? Remote employees are those people that are working somewhere besides the office, they telecommute. 
Posted by Mark Murphy on 29 November, 2016 Leadership Skills, Telecommuting, Video | 0 comments | Read more →

6 Traits Of Leaders Who Successfully Manage Remote Employees

While many of the traits that define a good manager vary depending on the organization, the team and the manager, through my studies I have identified a set of six personality traits universally found in the most successful leaders of remote teams. You may find you already naturally possess some of these characteristics while others you will have to work to develop.
Posted by Mark Murphy on 28 November, 2016 Forbes, Leadership Skills, Telecommuting | 0 comments | Read more →

Working In An Office Could Make You Miserable, Especially If You Have A Remote Personality

Some people have the personality to work remotely. These remote personalities are hard-charging go-getters with a self-motivated mindset. They’re fine working with fewer rules and more all-nighters. And they’re not fazed by the isolation, diminished emotional and administrative support, or the reduced collaboration and recognition of remote work.
Posted by Mark Murphy on 22 November, 2016 Forbes, Research, Telecommuting | 0 comments | Read more →

Here's What Scares Remote Employees

What Scares Remote EmployeesIf your boss doesn’t see you on a regular basis, it’s only natural to wonder if they’re actively thinking about you. After all, you might think, they could see lots of employees every day and have all sorts of great lunches and water cooler conversations. And if you were the boss, and had to choose someone for your next wickedly cool assignment with terrific growth opportunities, mightn’t you be more likely to choose the person with whom you share a daily coffee?
Posted by Mark Murphy on 03 August, 2016 Forbes, Telecommuting | 0 comments | Read more →

You’re 87% More Likely To Love Your Job If You Work From Home (i.e. Telecommuting)

Note: This study first appeared in Forbes on January 24th.

Only 24% of people who work in an office say they love their jobs. But 38% of mobile workers and a whopping 45% of telecommuting workers love their jobs!

During January, Leadership IQ surveyed 3,478 employees using an online test called Is Your Personality Suited To Working Remotely Or In The Office?.

We discovered that people who work from home (aka telecommuting) are almost twice as likely to love their jobs than employees who work in traditional co-located worksites (like office buildings). And mobile workers (i.e. using multiple workspaces, in and out of the office) were about 58% more likely to love their job than their office-based peers.

First we asked people where they usually work (in an office, mobile, or telecommute). And then we asked people to rate how they felt about their job (love, like, tolerate, dislike or hate). Here’s what we found…

love their job working from home

Note: For research purposes, respondents’ typical working situation is as follows: 22% chose Mobile work (where you use multiple spaces both in and out of the office), 13% chose Telework or telecommuting (in which you work primarily from a home office), and 65% chose a Traditional worksite (like an office building).

It’s clear from the chart that people who work remotely (whether telecommuting or being mobile) are significantly more likely to love their job. And employees who work remotely are significantly less likely to dislike or hate their jobs.

Parenthetically, every time we see the latest statistics about the sorry state of employee engagement, perhaps we should ask whether those employees are working in traditional offices or working remotely.

Now, some cynics will look at the data and say ‘of course telecommuters love their jobs, they sit in their pajamas all day doing nothing!’

Fortunately, we have some data from the test that debunks this notion. Two simple ways to test ‘why’ telecommuting employees love their jobs is to look at their ambition and how they meet deadlines.

To assess ambition, we asked respondents to choose between two statements…

  • Being 'average' in my work is a truly terrible thought for me.
  • I like to be good at my work but I don't need to be the absolute 'best.'
Obviously, those who can’t stand to be average are going to rate as having more ambition than those who don’t need to be the best. So, if we take everyone who said they love their job and we look at their ambition, remote workers (telecommuting and mobile workers) display more ambition than those in traditional worksites. Here’s the chart…

working from home ambition

If you want a workforce filled with hard-charging go-getters, whom would you rather hire: people who can’t stand being average or those who don’t want to be the best? Of course, you want the former. And the data shows that telecommuting and mobile workers who love their jobs are more likely to strive to be the best.

 We also discovered significant differences between remote workers and in-office workers in how they treat deadlines. We asked respondents to choose between two statements…

  • I hit deadlines no matter what, even if that means pulling all-nighters.
  • I sometimes need to ask for a little more time to finish projects on deadline.

 Again, if we look at only those workers who love their jobs, we see that remote workers (both telecommuting and mobile workers) are significantly more likely to say they’re willing to pull all-nighters than their office-based peers.

 working from home deadlines

Here’s my interpretation of the data. First, we can see that remote workers (both telecommuting and mobile workers) are more likely to love their jobs than people in the office. But why? The data suggests that to love working remotely you’ve got to have a hard-charging, go-getter, self-motivated mindset.

Working remotely isn’t always easy; there’s isolation, a fear of missing out, miscommunications, and more. So it seems that to overcome those pitfalls, a successful remote worker has to be driven and hard working. There’s often less support (emotional, administrative, managerial, etc.) for telecommuting and mobile workers. So the only way for them to survive and still achieve their desired career success is to push themselves to be the best and be willing to work all night to hit every deadline.

Working remotely is not for everyone, nor is it for every company. To assess your own fit, I’d encourage you to take the free online test: Is Your Personality Suited To Working Remotely Or In The Office?

The data in this article only scratches the surface of the telecommuting issue. But I do hope this data helps dispel the stereotype that working from home (i.e. telecommuting) means sitting in pajamas, watching television, doing laundry and only occasionally working.

To work remotely and love it requires striving harder and working longer. And while that’s certainly not for everybody, those traits are a far cry from the negative stereotypes we often hear.

MEDIA REQUESTS:
Please contact jill@leadershipiq.com to request an interview with Mark Murphy, CEO of Leadership IQ.

 

 

 

 

Posted by Mark Murphy on 22 February, 2016 Research, Telecommuting | 0 comments | Read more →

Stay in touch

Call us

We'd love to hear from you. Call us at 1-800-814-7859 and we'll be happy to answer any questions you have.

Latest posts

  • 5 Ways To Help Employees Overcome The Excuse Mentality
    ExcusesThe antidote to the excuse mentality is accountability where people take ownership, fix problems and bring solutions. Mentally and emotionally, accountability is where every leader wants their people to be. But accountability is not an either/or kind of phenomenon. Denial, blame, excuses and anxiety are all stages leading up to accountability that are part of the excuse mentality.

    This article originally appeared on Forbes by Mark Murphy, Founder of Leadership IQ The antidote to the excuse mentality is accountability where people take ownership, fix problems and bring solutions. Mentally and emotionally, accountability is where every leader wants their people... Read more →

  • Video: Flattery
    Here's a dirty little secret that falls under the heading of communication skills: Flattery actually does work. It is effective. Saying nice things to people is a really good way to build relationships (it's not the only way, but it is a helpful tool). Great sales people know this. 

      Make Flattery Part of Your Communication Skills Here's a dirty little secret that falls under the heading of communication skills: Flattery actually does work. It is effective. Saying nice things to people is a really good way to build... Read more →

  • Why Trying To Reach Consensus Can Make People Angry
    The majority of organizations like to consider themselves at least somewhat collaborative (most CEOs don’t raise their hands when you ask them if they want to create a cutthroat or dictatorial organization). Because of this, when we ask leaders how they like to make decisions, a large portion say they like to reach consensus.

    This article originally appeared on Forbes by Mark Murphy, Founder of Leadership IQ When I ask leaders how they like to make decisions, a large portion say they like to reach consensus. But actually reaching consensus is hard and usually time-consuming.... Read more →