Forbes Articles

4 Words to Calm Down Your Office Drama Queens (and Kings)

Office DramaThe Drama Queens (and Kings) at your office need to be the center of attention. They’re provocative, emotional and reactive. And they are highly skilled at getting everyone around them worked-up, frazzled and emotional (that’s how they stay at the center of attention).
So you’re going to manage them by doing the opposite (i.e. you’re going to be calm, cool and Factual).

6 Words For Stopping Blame And Increasing Accountability

BlameSometimes when people mess up at work, they dodge accountability and shift the responsibility to someone else. This is called blame.
Far too many of us have experienced an employee missing a deadline and trying to throw a colleague under the bus for their mistake, like:
“I couldn’t get this report done on time because of that jerk Pat in accounting.

Don't Bring Your Boss Only One Solution To A Problem

Managing UpImagine you discover a significant problem at work; the kind you need approval from your boss to solve. So you work up a proposal, bring it to your boss, and wait for approval. You’re a problem solver, and that’s what problem solvers do, right? You find a problem and generate a solution.
But imagine that instead of giving your proposal the green light, the boss says “that’s a good try, but I’d like to go in a different direction.”

Don't Make Constructive Criticism So Soft That People Miss Your Message

Constructive CriticismEffective constructive criticism maintains a delicate balance. When criticism is too harsh, recipients shut down emotionally, get defensive, and fail to hear a word you say. When criticism is too soft, recipients fail to hear the message that they really do need to change.

The Hidden Flaw In Behavioral Interview Questions

Behavioral InterviewWe’ve all used behavioral interview questions—questions that ask job candidates to recount a past experience so we can assess their likely future performance. In theory, behavioral interview questions should work just fine (because past behavior is usually a decent predictor of future behavior).
But most interviewers ask behavioral questions in a way that gives away the correct answer and thus ruins the question’s effectiveness.
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